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revision 2680 by ahallam, Thu Sep 10 02:58:44 2009 UTC revision 2681 by ahallam, Thu Sep 24 03:04:04 2009 UTC
# Line 194  T=mypde.getSolution() Line 194  T=mypde.getSolution()
194  \end{verbatim}  \end{verbatim}
195  The problem is now solved and plotting is required to visualise the data.  The problem is now solved and plotting is required to visualise the data.
196    
197    \subsection{Line profiles of 2D data}
198    It is possible to take slices or profile sections of 2d data using \mpl. To acheive this there are three major steps, firstly the solution must be smoothed across the domain using the \verb projector()  function.
199    \begin{verbatim}
200    proj=Projector(mymesh)
201    smthT=proj(T)
202    \end{verbatim}
203    The data must then be moved to a regular grid.
204    \begin{verbatim}
205    xi,yi,zi = toRegGrid(smthT,mymesh,200,200,width,depth)
206    \end{verbatim}
207    The profile can then be plotted by taking a slice of the data output \verb zi  .
208    \begin{verbatim}
209    cut=int(len(xi)/2)
210    pl.clf()
211    pl.plot(zi[:,cut],yi)
212    pl.title("Heat Refraction Temperature Depth Profile")
213    pl.xlabel("Temperature (K)")
214    pl.ylabel("Depth (m)")
215    \end{verbatim}
216    This process can be repeated for various variations of the solultion. In this case we have temperature, temperature gradient, thermal conductivity and heat flow \reffig{figs:dps}.
217    \begin{figure}
218    \centering
219        \subfigure[Temperature Depth Profile]{\includegraphics[width=3in]{figures/heatrefraction001tdp.png}\label{fig:tdp}}
220        \subfigure[Temperature Gradient Depth Profile]{\includegraphics[width=3in]{figures/heatrefraction001tgdp.png}\label{fig:tgdp}}
221        \subfigure[Thermal Conductivity Profile]{\includegraphics[width=3in]{figures/heatrefraction001tcdp.png}\label{fig:tcdp}}
222        \subfigure[Heat Flow Depth Profile]{\includegraphics[width=3in]{figures/heatrefraction001hf.png}\label{fig:hf}}
223      \caption{Depth profiles down centre of model.}
224      \label{figs:dps}
225    \end{figure}
226    
227    
228    
229    
230  \subsection{Quiver plots in \mpl}  \subsection{Quiver plots in \mpl}
231  To visualise this data we are going to do three things. Firstly we will generate the gradient of the solution and create some quivers or arrows that describe the gradient. Then we need to generate some temperatur contours and thirdly, we will create some polygons from our meshing output files to show our material boundaries.  To visualise this data we are going to do three things. Firstly we will generate the gradient of the solution and create some quivers or arrows that describe the gradient. Then we need to generate some temperatur contours and thirdly, we will create some polygons from our meshing output files to show our material boundaries.
232    
# Line 245  pl.title("Heat Refraction across a clina Line 278  pl.title("Heat Refraction across a clina
278  pl.savefig(os.path.join(saved_path,"heatrefraction001_contqu.png"))  pl.savefig(os.path.join(saved_path,"heatrefraction001_contqu.png"))
279  \end{verbatim}  \end{verbatim}
280  The data has now been plotted.  The data has now been plotted.
281  \begin{figure}[h]  \begin{figure}[ht]
282  \centerline{\includegraphics[width=4.in]{figures/heatrefraction001contqu}}  \centerline{\includegraphics[width=4.in]{figures/heatrefraction001contqu}}
283  \caption{Heat refraction model with gradient indicated by quivers.}  \caption{Heat refraction model with gradient indicated by quivers.}
284  \label{fig:hr001qumodel}  \label{fig:hr001qumodel}
# Line 254  The data has now been plotted. Line 287  The data has now been plotted.
287  \newpage  \newpage
288  \subsection{Fault and Overburden Model}  \subsection{Fault and Overburden Model}
289  A slightly more complicated model can be found in the examples \textit{heatrefraction_mesher002.py} and \textit{heatrefractoin002.py} where three blocks are used within the model.  A slightly more complicated model can be found in the examples \textit{heatrefraction_mesher002.py} and \textit{heatrefractoin002.py} where three blocks are used within the model.
290  \begin{figure}[h]  \begin{figure}[ht]
291  \centerline{\includegraphics[width=4.in]{figures/heatrefraction002contqu}}  \centerline{\includegraphics[width=4.in]{figures/heatrefraction002contqu}}
292  \caption{Heat refraction model with three blocks and gradient quivers.}  \caption{Heat refraction model with three blocks and gradient quivers.}
293  \end{figure}  \end{figure}

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